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"Wendy Redroad is our go-to girl on the topic of forgiveness. She shares a powerful journey intertwining healing and forgiveness for women who've suffered all manner of abuse. She is relatable, compassionate, and biblically sound in her approach as she takes women by the hand and gently walks them through their own journey to healing and freedom."

--www.valianthearts.org 

 

 

 

 

Redroad Outreach has a matching donor for up to 7,500.00!

Will you help us expand our reach to faith communities in need of resources that speak to the needs of victims and secondary victims of abuse, abandonment, and traumatic betrayal?

Online

Click HERE to donate online using your credit card, debit card, or bank draft.

Mail

The Hope Center
2001 W. Plano Parkway
Suite 3422
Plano, TX 75075
Please make your gift payable to WNPA and include
Redroad Outreach in the memo line.

 

Your gift is tax-deductible.

Thursday, October 6, 2011 12:55 PM

Grace For A Mother's Temporary Insanity

Thursday, October 6, 2011 12:55 PM
Thursday, October 6, 2011 12:55 PM

I couldn't imagine my friend losing control. Loving God and her family was her highest priority. I was accustomed to seeing her every few weeks then she quietly vanished from my life. I thought of her often, left messages, but still no contact for almost a year.

Then one day she called. And in the midst of inquiring what the other had been up to, she revealed the reason for her disappearance. Which turned out to be a long season of what I refer to as  high-maintenance-parenting: sleepless nights followed by stressful days filled with conversations that leave you too drained to remember your own name much less keep up good appearances. When a smile is too difficult to maintain, we Christians often withdrawal for fear that we might be seen hurting.

My friend struggled to reconcile a situation that had taken place in her family. She and her husband attended church, loved God and provided a good home for their children. But they were not immune to teenage rebellion . . . even as Christians. She told me of the night her son was arrested and of his return home. In spite of everything, rock bottom had not yet arrived, his verbal attacks on her resumed, and a gentle woman finally snapped. She hit him.

"How did this happen?" she asked. "We aren't violent people. Things like this don't happen in our home."

Tears of confusion, shame, and regret accompanied her confession. I empathized with her and felt compelled to confess a time when lost control. 

My oldest son, Christopher, was hard to parent throughout high school. I did everything I could to keep him from smoking pot; to no avail. And he never denied smoking when I inquired.

"Yep, I'm high." He'd say.

He didn't care if I grounded him or took privileges away because the severity of cystic acne robbed him of a social life. He spent most of his time alone playing an acoustic guitar, and I often wondered how something so beautiful could pour out of someone so angry.

Eighteen was the toughest age of all. By then he'd mastered the pushing of every button I had. He wanted the freedom that accompanies adulthood but with none of the responsibilities. A combination that would soon lead to my emotional demise (at least for a moment). I don't remember what he said, but whatever it was, it invoked one of those, "this is my house" meltdowns. I charged into his room, stepped onto his bed, and began pulling posters off the wall.

In a flash, he stood nose to nose with me and after a few verbal exchanges I dare not repeat, I grabbed the collar of his shirt. I won't sugar coat it. I fully intended to separate my  firstborns head from his shoulders and ask God to heal him later!

The next thing I knew, my husband, Michael, was pulling me off of him. Hours later when we had all calmed down, I said to Michael, "Christopher would never hurt me. There was no need for you to intervene."

"I wasn't afraid HE was going to hurt YOU. I was afraid YOU were going to hurt HIM."

By the end of the story, my sweet friend's tears had turned into the type of inappropriate laughter that comes from pain coupled with pure exhaustion. Grace had gently placed her feet back on the road to human frailty by prompting me to confess something I preferred to keep to myself. 

No casualties to date in either family. God is still in control.

"...for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus..." (Romans 3:23-24 NKJV). 

Q4U: Have you "lost it" with a loved one recently? Apologize. Ask God to forgive you. Amend your behavior. Move on.

 

Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:53 AM

Praying For A Prodigal Son

Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:53 AM
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:53 AM

I've seen him twice in three weeks...

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